Temple Bar: Culture that rocks!

Temple Bar: Culture that rocks!

Temple Bar: Culture that rocks! Destination of thousands of tourists, cradle of a quivering arts district and a unique alternative buzzing quarter, Temple Bar is full of colors, perfumes and history that must be told. It rocks, as we love to say. Walking through the small streets and squares, that give a home to our museum, you can feel a different atmosphere at any time of the day. But, before talking about what Temple Bar is today, let’s take a quick look to its recent history. How did it become the kernel of creativity in Dublin? In the 1980s C.I.É, a state transport company, wanted to buy and demolish the area to build a bus terminus. While planning, it rented the buildings at a very low price, attracting artists, galleries and small shops to the area. Thanks to the protests of the National Trust of Ireland, the initial project was cancelled. In 1991, Temple Bar Properties was born: a non-for-profit company appointed by the government to safeguard and oversee the regeneration of the area. Beside the odd anti-social problems, expensive prices and excessive crowds, Temple Bar currently hosts buskers, street artists, open air markets(A must visit every Wednesday evening is the Temple Bar Night Market), The National Photographic Archive, The Gallery of Photography, The Irish Film Institute, The Project Arts Centre, The Ark and… us, of course! The Irish Rock’n’roll Museum! Among all the forms of arts, music has always been in the graces of this magic place. Here, traditional Irish music and alternative, innovative, rock music live together - influencing everyday new generations of artists.   Take a...
Ireland’s Influence On The American Rock Scene – From An American

Ireland’s Influence On The American Rock Scene – From An American

Ireland’s Influence On The American Rock Scene - From An American   Have you ever tried to define that “something” that Ireland has? That “Irish flair”? I was trying to write a description, but any attempt was terrible. It’s very difficult to express it with words, but y’all know what I’m talking about. So, while famous bands and artists like Thin Lizzy, U2, The Pogues and The Dubliners were taking stance as classic Irish Rockers, their sound and their Irish-being was influencing a new generation of musicians on the other side of the world: (drumroll)… America!   Let me introduce you to… 3 Irish-American artists who brought the Irish flair to the American rock scene!   Dropkick Murphys I’m American so naturally the first band I’ll mention are the Dropkick Murphys. They bring Irish flair  to St. Patrick’s Day festivals around the world and they kick ass when they’re gigging bars around Boston. They are one of the most famous American Celtic Punk Bands. Dropkick Murphys just released their new album “11 Stories of Pain and Glory”, but they are slaying the American scene since their foundation in 1996. The founding member Ken Casey, bass guitarist and singer, took inspiration from The Pogues, The Dubliners and Greenland Whalefishers to fuse the band’s iconic Celtic sound with American Punk angst.   Sorry fans but their Dublin July concert is already sold out! We’ll all need to be faster next time, myself included.   Flogging Molly This is the story of Dave, a kid that grew up on the south-side of Dublin. He left his beloved city to move to California...
Hot Press Magazine – The biggest influencer in the Irish Music Industry is  40 years old

Hot Press Magazine – The biggest influencer in the Irish Music Industry is 40 years old

Hot Press Magazine - The biggest influencer in the Irish Music Industry is already 40 years old     Every Irish artist dreams about their consecration as the day he/she will be on the Hot Press cover. Going back in time, we could name many established artists, like Hozier, hoping to be baptized as a rock stars by THE magazine. Since 1977 it delivered to its readers interesting, quality content, differentiating from the other magazines for its distinctive interviews. They define themselves as the writers’ journal. And they definitely are. As of today, we can state that Hot Press is an indispensable part of Irish cultural heritage. So, in a lunch break of a weirdly sunny day in Dublin, walking around Temple Bar, I came across a free (FREE!) Hot Press covers exhibition. I obviously walked in and… how fascinating! The exhibition is organised for Hot Press’ 40th birthday, in collaboration with and in the spaces of the National Library of Ireland’s National Photographic Archive. It gives you the overall look you need to understand how they were able to grow and change during the years, without losing their touch and their personality. A clear evidence of their evolution is their logo: always different, but coherent with their vision. They fought and are fighting for social causes from multi-cultural Ireland, women’s social and political rights, sexual freedom between consenting adults to the referendum for marriage equality and the 8th March repeal. (Incidentally the Vinyl Love collective are running Vinyl love for Repeal events all week-end too click for more info below! Anyway back to the free Hot Press Expo....
Why Records are Still Better than Digital | Record Store Day 2017

Why Records are Still Better than Digital | Record Store Day 2017

Why Records are STILL better than digital. With international record day hitting on April 22nd 2017 we’re getting a little nostalgic and emotional about the old school art form of record collecting. Sure, you can get everything online nowadays, and with the likes of Spotify, Deezer, I-Tunes and Soundcloud to name a few, you can reach your favourite music faster than ever. While that’s all well and good we still think there’s nothing quite as real as sinking back into a chair, popping on your favourite vinyl and listening to good old analog. So before we disappear off to our neighbours Claddagh Records and have a fan fit over a limited edition of U2’s new 2017 mix of “Red Hill Mining Town”, let us quantifiably prove to you that records are STILL better than digital. 5. Analog is still alive and thriving. Walk into any rock and roll store these days and you’ll see they’re not empty. Spindizzy on Georges Street, Tower Records, amongst others are full of serious music fans and collectors alike Monday to Sunday. They’re filled with the believers of the craft of music. See it’s expensive these days to create a vinyl track, it costs more than digital and the turnaround time is roughly about 4 to 8 weeks. The only people who will put themselves through this are the musical big wigs and the real music nuts. We love the music nuts just so you know.   4. Analog still sounds better. When creating music nowadays you can do layer upon layer of music but there’s something magical about the fact that analog squashes all the sound down into...
5 Most Iconic Irish Rock Songs from the Movies.

5 Most Iconic Irish Rock Songs from the Movies.

5 Iconic Irish Rock Songs from the Movies. We’re mad about Irish Rock Music here in the Irish Rock N Roll Museum. Who would have guessed it? But we’re all fairly well versed when it comes to the movies as well. In particular I like pinpointing Irish Rock songs that feature on movie soundtracks. It shows that we Irish punch well above our weight in the art, something we are most certainly proud of. Below is most certainly not a comprehensive list but it’s a start. 5. “Mustang Sally” By The Commitments - The Commitments All Irish people are well conversed with the story of the commitments. It’s a great Irish movie and a great Irish band were formed out of it that did a tour a few years back. If you’re a tourist reading this blog and you’re coming to Ireland you must watch The Van, The Commitments and The Snapper. If you’re an Irish person reading this blog here’s a reminder to watch them again! 4. “Arsonist’s Lullaby” By Hozier - Live By The Night Ben Affleck’s movie Live by the night was a bit of a visual beauty but was critically panned as his worst directorial choice to date. The use of Hozier’s song “Arsonist’s Lullaby”, was a more refined choice and produced a great movie trailer. Pity the movie wasn’t up to scratch. 3. “Shipping Up To Boston” By The Dropkick Murphys - The Departed The Dropkick Murphy’s are an American Irish Celtic Punk band and their song “Shipping Up to Boson” featured heavily in The Departed. It’s one of those songs which knocked up and said...
Irelands Top 5 Rock n Roll Mother’s

Irelands Top 5 Rock n Roll Mother’s

Ireland’s Mothers of Rock N Roll We only have one mother in this life, and sometimes they don’t get the appreciation they deserve. The woman that nursed us when we were sick, the woman who would move mountains to make us happy, and not to forget the woman who would threaten us with the wooden spoon when we were bold. Yes, a mother’s love is unconditional, but everyone knows, there’s no mammy like an Irish mammy. To celebrate  Mothers Day we wanted to wish everyone’s mammy a very special day, but especially some of the Irish rocking mammy’s, & mammy’s of rockers. Here are our Top 5 Irish Rocking Mammy’s.   Imelda May Imelda has been a busy woman over the last few years. She got the attention of the country in 2008 with her song ‘Johnny Got A Boom Boom’ and has been on the train for success ever since. With over 5 studio albums under her belt, annual world tours, and even had her own tv programme on RTE ‘The Imelda May Show’. On top of all that, Imelda is one cool mammy, and will surely pass on her talent to her daughter. Happy Mothers Day Imelda May. Sinead O Connor Sinead O Connor is no stranger to the lime light, and has an impressive career spanning nearly three decades. She has worked with the likes of ‘The Chieftans’, had a leading role in Neil Jordan’s film ‘The Butcher Boy’ and is famously known for her timeless hits ‘Mandinka’ and ‘Nothing Compares 2 U’. Sinead has always is a true national treasure, and we were blessed with the music she has produced. Happy...